Using Taxan Monitors with Macintosh Hardware

 

Introduction

 

Apple Macintosh machines will all support Taxan monitors without difficulty. Most of our microprocessor models include factory presets for the standard Apple video modes appropriate to the size of monitor. Difficulties may arise with older Apple machines which use the DB15 connector and which do not have DDC support. Apple had their own method of determining the monitor type before DDC using a sophisticated sensing system using three pins on the DB15 connector. To enable a non apple monitor to use this sensing system, an adaptor was necessary (MACADAP) which enabled manual setting of the monitor type.

The most recent Apple Hardware (G3 and G4 Power Macintosh) uses VGA type connectors (HD15) and behaves much more like a conventional PC in its monitor detection – using DDC to detect monitor type and falling back to the Apple sense system only if the monitor does not support DDC.

 

Connectors

 

Apple Macintosh machines use three main connectors. The standard DB15 connector was used on most colour machines since the Mac II where there was a video controller integrated on the motherboard, or where an Apple proprietary video controller was used. Radius and Supermac brand video cards also used the DB15 connector although the later Radius cards also have an HD15 (VGA) connector as well. Most Apple branded monitors have been fitted with an integral DB15 connector. The more recent models have had an HD15 with an HD15/DB15 adapter provided.

The most recent Apple Mac machines – the G3 and G4 towers – have either PCI or AGB bus connectors and are supplied with Mac-specific ATi graphics cards which have HD15 connectors as standard.

Apple G3 & G4 Powerbook computers and the new G4 tower machines also have a proprietary connector known as the Apple Display Connector (ADC). This carries digital signals suitable for digital flat panel monitors as well as analogue signals for conventional monitors.